Our Services

Colonoscopy

A Colonoscopy is an examination of the bowel (large intestine or colon) using a flexible telescope called a colonoscope. The colonoscopy allows for a variety of operations to be carried out such as tissue samples (biopsies), removal of polyps and the stopping of bleeding. An alternative method of examination of the large bowel is by x-ray or CT Scan. Colonoscopy has the advantage over x-ray tests of generally being more accurate for detecting diseases of the bowel and also allows for biopsies to be taken and polyps removed.

Patients have a colonoscopy for several reasons. For example, there may be symptoms such as bleeding, altered bowel habit or pain suggesting a disorder of the bowel. Alternatively, it may be performed as a screening test for cancer or polyps in people with or without symptoms, or as a follow up test after a positive FOBT.

Upper Gastroscopy

Gastroscopy (or Endoscopy) is an examination of the oesophagus (food pipe), stomach and duodenum (upper part of the small bowel) using a flexible telescope with a small camera and light source. It allows for procedures to be carried out such as tissue samples (biopsies), removal of polyps and the stopping of bleeding. An alternative method of examination of the oesophagus is by x-ray (Barium Meal). Gastroscopy has the advantage over x-ray tests of generally being more accurate for detecting diseases and allows for biopsies to be taken and polyps removed.
Patients have a gastroscopy to treat certain conditions through the gastroscope, or they may have symptoms of indigestion or discomfort suggesting an ulcer.

Capsule Endoscopy

Capsule Endoscopy is a technology that uses a swallowed video capsule to take photographs of the inside of the oesophagus, stomach and small intestine. The capsule is about the size of a multi-vitamin pill and has its own light source, camera, battery and radio transmitter. As the capsule travels throughout the gastrointestinal system it takes photographs rapidly which are transmitted by the radio transmitter to a small receiver that is on a sensor belt worn around the waist of the patient. After 8 hours the belt is removed and the images are downloaded from the receiver to a computer where the images are reviewed by Dr Crostella. The capsule is passed by the patient into the toilet and flushed away as there is no need to retrieve the capsule.
Capsule Endoscopy is used to look at the small intestine, the organ located between your stomach and large intestine which the Colonoscopy or Gastroscopy cannot reach.

Endoscopic Ultrasound

Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is a minimally invasive procedure to assess digestive (gastrointestinal) and lung diseases. A special endoscope uses high-frequency sound waves to produce detailed images of the lining and walls of your digestive tract and chest, nearby organs such as the pancreas and liver, and lymph nodes. EUS is used to find the cause of symptoms such as abdominal or chest pain, to determine the extent of diseases in your digestive tract and lungs, and to evaluate findings from imaging tests such as a CT scan or MRI.

ERCP

Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, or ERCP, is a specialised technique used to study the ducts or “drainage tubes” of the gallbladder, pancreas and liver. During the procedure an endoscope (a thin, flexible tube) will be passed through your mouth, into the oesophagus and stomach and then into the first part of the small intestine. This is the area of the bowel where the ‘drainage tubes’ (“bile duct” and “pancreatic duct”) connect onto the bowel. A small plastic instrument will then be placed through the endoscope and passed into the bile duct and/ or the pancreatic duct and x-ray dye is injected in order to obtain a picture of these ducts. Sometimes a small cut is made into the muscle surrounding the opening to the bile duct (“sphincterotomy”) in order to allow better drainage of the bile duct or to perform other procedures such as remove stones, biopsy, place stents (drainage tubes) or stretch narrowing of the bile duct.